Did The Decision To Close The Stadium Roof Give Roger Federer An Edge In The Australian Open Final? | Media Hard

Did The Decision To Close The Stadium Roof Give Roger Federer An Edge In The Australian Open Final?

Did The Decision To Close The Stadium Roof Give Roger Federer An Edge In The Australian Open Final?

Yes, the quality of the match was often superb.

On the other hand, the tournament directors no doubt saw both players suffering because of the heat during the match and perhaps imagined how good it might have been if they weren’t seriously dehydrated. (Halep was reportedly hospitalized after the match.)

They also realized that if the women’s final was a best-of-five set match like the men’s, there was a very good chance the match would have ended with one of the players retiring because they simply couldn’t play any more.

They also likely had a further flashback to the semis where Hyeon Chung retired after less than two sets against Roger Federer. Couple Chung’s  retirement (because of blisters) with previous defaults or injury-related exits by Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Kyle Edmund, and there was clearly a very real concern that the men’s final might end with the worst-possible outcome: a TKO.

So with the temperature at 100 degrees at match time, the tournament referee decided to close the roof for the Federer-Cilic final as part of the tournament’s unusual Extreme Heat Policy.  Despite brutal, and even dangerous heat in the opening days of the tournament, the EHP was not invoked. The organizers employ a complex set of criteria for closing the roof on the stadium court (or suspending play on outside courts without a roof) that relies not only on temperature but humidity which is factored into a so-called wet-bulb reading. This was the first time the EHP was invoked since 2014.

Did one player or another get an advantage by playing the men’s final indoors?

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The 2018 Australian Open featured two great tennis matches in the men’s and women’s finals. Despite that, the tournament administration had a really bad weekend because of their decision to close the stadium roof for the men’s match in the wake of brutal temperature and humidity, a choice which some suggested gave an advantage to eventual champion Roger Federer.

On Saturday, the women’s final was played in oppressive heat, but with the roof open. Runner-up Simona Halep needed assistance from the trainer midway through the second set and eventual champion Caroline Wozniacki got aid during a third-set changeover.

Yes, the quality of the match was often superb.

On the other hand, the tournament directors no doubt saw both players suffering because of the heat during the match and perhaps imagined how good it might have been if they weren’t seriously dehydrated. (Halep was reportedly hospitalized after the match.)

They also realized that if the women’s final was a best-of-five set match like the men’s, there was a very good chance the match would have ended with one of the players retiring because they simply couldn’t play any more.

They also likely had a further flashback to the semis where Hyeon Chung retired after less than two sets against Roger Federer. Couple Chung’s  retirement (because of blisters) with previous defaults or injury-related exits by Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Kyle Edmund, and there was clearly a very real concern that the men’s final might end with the worst-possible outcome: a TKO.

So with the temperature at 100 degrees at match time, the tournament referee decided to close the roof for the Federer-Cilic final as part of the tournament’s unusual Extreme Heat Policy.  Despite brutal, and even dangerous heat in the opening days of the tournament, the EHP was not invoked. The organizers employ a complex set of criteria for closing the roof on the stadium court (or suspending play on outside courts without a roof) that relies not only on temperature but humidity which is factored into a so-called wet-bulb reading. This was the first time the EHP was invoked since 2014.

Did one player or another get an advantage by playing the men’s final indoors?

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